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SERVICES

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75-80% of elephants held in captivity by the Asian tourism industry live in conditions of Severe Cruelty.*
Thailand holds nearly 2x as many elephants for tourism purposes than all other Asian countries combined.*
For training purposes, babies are often taken from mothers at a young age to be "broken," meaning that they are beaten to break their spirits and render them trainable.*
When not performing, most of these elephants are stored in cages with concrete floors, manacled to short lengths of chain.*
With tourism on the rise, the number of elephants brought into captivity has increased 30% in 5 years.*
Tourists are meant to believe that performing elephants are 'having fun,' or, in the case of painting, 'expressing themselves.'
Proponents of the captive elephant tourist industry in the East compare them to the use of horses in the West. These two species are very different in many ways.
Elephant anatomy, such as the dense, stacked bone structure of their powerful legs, is perfect for bearing heavy weight and moving for long periods of time.
Elephants do not have hooves to protect their feet from terrain which they were not designed to walk on.
When not performing, most of these elephants are stored in cages with concrete floors, manacled to short lengths of chain.*
The major threat to Indian Elephants is habitat loss, but for African Elephants it is poaching for ivory, which is primarily sold in Asian markets. Though it is illegal to bring into the U.S., many sneak it in. 
There are many ethical places to visit in Asian countries to enjoy elephants that do not contribute to problematic industry practices. Search the web to plan your visit.

CONTACT US

3425 Pelham Parkway

Pelham, AL 35124

(205) 829-1829

info@harmoncpafirm.com

Fax (205) 829-1199 

​​​​© 2019 by Loren Harmon for Harmon & Associates